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Sanford Biggers in Group Show "Figuring the Floral"

Sanford Biggers in Group Show "Figuring the Floral"

Wave Hill, The Bronx, NY

July 21 – December 1, 2019

A flower’s life cycle of budding, blooming and pollinating, as well as its process of decay, strongly echoes the human condition. The exhibition Figuring the Floral features artists who apply this symbolism to their work—touching on race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, aging and other facets of identity. Reflecting on the site-specificity of these works exhibited amid the flourishing gardens of Wave Hill, Curator of Visual Arts Eileen Jeng Lynch notes how the exhibition is enhanced by the visible and tangible connections with flora on the grounds.

Jennifer Bartlett, Sanford Biggers and Frank Stella in Group Show "Less Is a Bore: Maximalist Art & Design"

Jennifer Bartlett, Sanford Biggers and Frank Stella in Group Show "Less Is a Bore: Maximalist Art & Design"

ICA Boston, Boston, MA

June 26 – September 22, 2019

Less Is a Bore: Maximalist Art & Design brings together works in painting, sculpture, ceramic, dance, furniture design, and more that privilege decoration, pattern, and maximalism.

Sanford Biggers in Group Show "Get Up, Stand Up Now"

Sanford Biggers in Group Show "Get Up, Stand Up Now"

Somerset House, London, UK

June 12 – September 15, 2019

Beginning with the radical Black filmmaker Horace Ové and his dynamic circle of Windrush generation creative peers and extending to today’s brilliant young Black talent globally, a group of 110 interdisciplinary artists are showcasing their work together for the first time, exploring Black experience and influence, from the post-war era to the present day.

Sanford Biggers in Group Show "America Will Be!"

Sanford Biggers in Group Show "America Will Be!"

Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX

April 6 – September 15, 2019

Drawing on works from the DMA’s permanent collection, this exhibition presents the ways in which contemporary artists engage with landscapes, broadly defined, exploring how our natural and built environments intersect with our representations of ourselves and our communities. The landscape has been both a traditional art historical genre and a means of mythologizing the origins of American history and culture as a colonial product, creating an image of unclaimed terrain that erased the people who already inhabited it.